Rene Hensler

Toyota Remains World’s Most Valuable Car Brand, Study Finds

Tesla was the only car brand to increase its value.

Just three automakers made it to the top 100 brands in market researcher Kantar’s latest 2020 BrandZ Top 100 Most Valuable Brands study. Toyota, ranked 48th overall, still remains the world’s most valuable car brand despite losing approximately 3 percent of its value compared to 2019.

Mercedes-Benz is the second most valuable brand in the automotive industry according to the study, placing 56th overall, followed by BMW at 61st position, losing 9 and 12 percent respectively. Ford and Honda dropped off the top 100 list after losing 10 and 15 percent of their values compared to 2019.

The Results From 2018 And 2019:

“Since 2008, the car sector has declined in value and has never recovered,” Global BrandZ Strategy Director, Graham Staplehurst, told Automotive News. “It’s very different from other sectors. For example, the luxury sector

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The Greatest Cars of All Time: Choosing the One

From Car and Driver

Michael Jordan. The Beatles. Bill Murray. Some giants stand so far above the rest that their exceptionalism is a foregone conclusion. You can argue that someone else played the game better, but the societal consensus says you’re just being a contrarian.

No vehicle looms large enough to be the uncontested greatest, though. We know because, in the course of debating Car and Driver‘s list of legends, we hit gridlock when we tried to pick the one car that was greater than the other 41.

We named our GOATs based on their technological innovation, influence on the industry, simple beauty, and/or driver engagement. Any car that’s going to rise above the others needs to rank highly in all four of those categories. Its shape should be as graceful as the Lamborghini Miura’s, the Jaguar E-type’s, or the split-window Chevy Corvette’s. It should dissect a decreasing-radius

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Tentative restart to UK car market in June

New car sales are down almost 50% in 2020 so far. Photo: Adrian Dennis/AFP via Getty Images
New car sales are down almost 50% in 2020 so far. Photo: Adrian Dennis/AFP via Getty Images

New car registrations, which had all but ground to a halt in April and May due to coronavirus lockdowns, began to pick up slowly in June.

Data released on Monday from the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) showed that new car registrations in June were almost 35% lower than the same month last year, with 145,377 new cars registered.

“While it’s welcome to see demand rise above the rock-bottom levels we saw during lockdown, this is not a recovery and barely a restart,” said SMMT chief executive Mike Hawes in a statement.

Carmakers in the UK suffered their worst drop in sales since the year after WWII ended in April and May — just 197 cars were produced in April and 5,314 in May.

“Many of June’s registrations could be attributed

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