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Cure auto insurance Super Bowl commercial just raised the bar for tone deaf ads

The Cure Auto Insurance Super Bowl commercial is hands-down the worst Super Bowl ad of 2021. It’s one of those spots that will likely become instantly despised — even by people who never heard of the company before.

The premise is simple, and stupid. A woman (who doesn’t even get to have a name) brings an idiot named Tommy into her boss’s office to explain that Tommy brought her into his office and “whipped out his opinion” — except that Opinion is said in such a way that you can tell it’s supposed to be a place-holder for something you should never show your coworkers.

In case you didn’t get the terrible joke, Tommy then says “she was into it” and brags that he has “a pretty big opinion.”

Their boss, Ms. Davis, tells Tommy that nobody in the office “wants” his opinion. Tommy then repeats the joke again, recalling

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Cure Auto Insurance’s ‘Whip it Out’ Super Bowl ad slammed as offensive

Crash and burn is one way to describe this Super Bowl 2021 ad.

Cure Auto Insurance is being roasted for its “Whip It Out” commercial, with the Twitterverse racing to condemn it as “tone deaf” for using sexual harassment in the workplace as fodder for lame jokes.

The commercial aired just before The Weeknd’s halftime performance on Sunday during the biggest night of the year for football — and pricey television advertising.

The 30-second spot opens with a visibly upset employee storming into her boss’s office and declaring: “Miss Davis, Tommy just brought me into his office and whipped out his opinion.”

“I didn’t just whip it out — she was into it,” Tommy blurts out in his defense. “Plus, I have a pretty big opinion.”

The blond boss lady — a self-professed fan of “margaritas” — then interjects: “Tommy, not everyone in this office wants your opinion,” prompting

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There’s been an uptick in car burglaries and auto thefts as Americans shelter in place

A black vehicle with an open door in side of the road. Image taken during summer. The driver is needing for help or giving assistance for example. cardooropenabandonedincidentvehiclebackgroundfrontskywhiteasphaltassistanceautobeautifulblackblueemergencyhappenhelplookingnatureoneoutdoorparkroadroadsidesceneryseatsidestolenstopsummertraveltripwheelwindowShow more
A black vehicle with an open door in side of the road. Image taken during summer. The driver is needing for help or giving assistance for example. cardooropenabandonedincidentvehiclebackgroundfrontskywhiteasphaltassistanceautobeautifulblackblueemergencyhappenhelplookingnatureoneoutdoorparkroadroadsidesceneryseatsidestolenstopsummertraveltripwheelwindowShow more

Shutterstock / Jne Valokuvaus

  • Some cities are seeing an increase in car-related crimes as Americans use their cars less. 

  • In one case, Seattle police returned a car to an owner who didn’t even know it’d been stolen. 

  • New York City and Los Angeles have seen upticks in auto larceny of 67% and 17%, respectively. 

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Americans are driving far fewer miles than usual because of the coronavirus pandemic. That’s been great news for the environment, and the air is the cleanest in some places it’s been in decades.

But there’s a trade-off: a spike in automotive-related crimes.

“You might as well put a sticker on the window that says ‘come take my stuff,'” Alex

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