cars

How One Engineer Landed a Dream Job of Developing Cars for Bugatti

From Autoweek

Meet Sven Bohnhorst, the luckiest man in the world. Why, you ask? Because he gets paid to drive Bugattis around racetracks. Afterwards, he makes changes to the Bugatti and drives it again to see whether he likes it or not. Bohnhorst is a chassis setup engineer at Bugatti, and he does things like tune the steering on cars like the upcoming Chiron Pur Sport. The car that Bugatti limited sales to 60 at a price of 3,000,000 euros, which is about $3,400,000, is his development mule.

Intrigued and curious how Bohnhorst managed to get this position, we asked him how he got the job, what makes the Pur Sport stand out from the standard Chiron and much more.

Photo credit: Bugatti

Autoweek: How did you become an engineer at Bugatti?

Sven Bohnhorst: I started at Bugatti as a trainee, then continued as a working student and

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30 Vintage Cars for Under $10,000

America’s love affair with the car runs deep. From Portland to, well, Portland, every town in America is probably going to have at least one gearhead who can rattle off all the differences between model years on 1940s Fords like they’re reciting the alphabet. For them, buying and/or restoring some of the classic cars of yesteryear is pretty much the only hobby that makes any sense.

And while the phrase “collecting vintage cars” might immediately conjure up images of country club elites and wildly rich retired comedians, it certainly doesn’t have to be that way. There are cheaper hobbies, but you can keep your car-collecting costs low if you’re ready to compromise on buying cars in mint condition. Whether you enjoy doing the restoration work yourself or just don’t mind the wear and tear, you can find options for true classics that can be had for less than five figures.

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6 key questions answered on new, used cars, trucks, SUVs

Looking for a deal on a car in the midst of the pandemic?

There are some to be had, but don’t expect everything to be on sale just because the economy is sputtering.

Automakers dialed back discounts in June after ramping them up in May, and interest rates have ticked upward after reaching historic lows.

But deals are still better than this time last year. Here are answers to six key questions about new- and used-car shopping.

When do new cars come out?: You’ll have to wait to buy 2021, as automakers delay next year’s models

Ford discontinues Lincoln Continental: Luxury sedan usurped by SUVs

Clearing out last year’s models?

Are dealers trying to sell off 2020 models before the 2021 cars and trucks arrive? Not yet. About two months of downtime at most manufacturing plants due to the pandemic means that dealers don’t have a surplus of vehicles.

“While

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